The Square, Rathdowney, Co. Laois

[graphic]
Bibliographic Details
Main Creator: French, Robert, 1841-1917 photographer
Contributors: Lawrence, William, 1840-1932
In collection: The Lawrence Photograph Collection
Format: Photo
Published / Created: [Circa 1900].
Subjects:
Notes:Additional information about this photograph is available on the National Library of Ireland's Flickr Commons photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8166240548

Robert French was the chief photographer responsible for photographing three quarters of the Lawrence Collection. For more information, see the Dictionary of Irish Biography: http://dib.cambridge.org/viewReadPage.do?articleId=a3369

Physical description: 1 photographic negative glass 16.5 x 21.5 cm.

Geographic Coverage: Rathdowney, County Laois, Province of Leinster, Ireland.

Caption on glassplate reads: The Square. Rathdowney. Queens Co. 10398. W. L.

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This photo was taken probably by Robert French, chief photographer of William Lawrence Photographic Studios of Dublin.
You can compare this view of the The Square at Rathdowney with its companion photo taken approximately 90 years later as part of the Lawrence Photographic Project 1990/1991, where one thousand photographs from the Lawrence Collection in the National Library of Ireland were replicated a hundred years later by a team of volunteer photographers, thereby creating a record of the changing face of the selected locations all over Ireland.
For further information on the Lawrence Photographic Project, read all about it on our NLI Blog.
Date: 1900??
NLI Ref.: L_ROY_10398

Comments

TJ.Photography
Question please: why the writing at the bottom is reversed?
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@tj_q8 It's a glass plate negative. If you look at any of our Lawrence photos (or images from many of our other collections), you'll see the same thing...
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
John Spooner
The establishment on the right looks like H C Perry & Son, but amongst those present at the 1896 Licensed Grocers and Vintners' Association's Annual Meeting (as reported in Freeman's) were "Edrwd Irwin Campbell, R Crawford (R Perry & Son, Rathdowney)" [edit] Must be different Perry - in 1878 Mr. Robinson Perry of Rathdowney was described in the Belfast News-letter as Secretary of the Provincial Brewers Association.
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
derangedlemur
Raglan Cycles: 1896 The company was registered on 4 December, to take over the businesses of Taylor, Cooper and Bednell and the Anti-Friction Ball Co
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
derangedlemur
They built a 2hp motorcycle and forecar from 1902-1903, yet ultimately concentrated on cycle production throughout which lasted until around 1906. So you've got a date range of 1896 - 1906 (plus however long it takes to remove a sign - 20 years?).
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
derangedlemur
Does the side of the shop say PG Wonders? Is it a tea advertisement? Edit: Ah, no. It says Ironmonger.
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
mogey
maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=Rathdowney,+Ireland&hl=en&am... amazing how little its changed
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
derangedlemur
May as well have the OSI ref: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,628136,678333,7,9
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
John Spooner
Could the shop with the fancy frontage be Richard Williams and Sons? [I see from the tags that it is - I shouldn't have wasted my time squinting at the pixels and coming to no conclusion at all] If so, they were advertising in the Belfast News-letter on August 7th 1897 for staff
WANTED, a young man for boot department; must know the business thoroughly; liberal salary to a competent man; also, Assistant for general grocery and hardware. - Apply, Richard Williams & Sons, Rathdowney.

Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
John Spooner
Mazawattee tea (Aberdeen Weekly Journal 1897) mazawattee The origin of the name 'Mazawattee' according to Wikipedia:
John Lane Densham ... reckoned that something quite unusual might be the answer and went to the Guildhall Library to get ideas. He came up with the idea of using the word “Mazathawattee”, perhaps based on the Hindi “Mazaa”, which means "pleasure or fun," and the Sinhalese “vatta," which means "a garden."

Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
John Spooner
Belfast News-letter, March 17 1877: Perry According to a similar advert in 1887, the H stands for Henry,
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
Foxglove
I had a look at the 1990 copy; not a lot changes in 90-100 years in small towns .... anywhere!
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@mogey Thanks for location, and it is amazingly unchanged...
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@johnspooner Love the ads!
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
guliolopez
Love that the frontage of the ironmongers (William's and Sons) and the ironwork canopy further down the street didn't change in the 90 years between photos. (And haven't since changed in the subsequent 22 years). I wonder (hope) that developers and owners look at these kinds of old photos and see the importance of retaining even smaller architectural details during developments.
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@20727502@N00 I agree! Think we've rarely seen such continuity of shop fronts in our photos, as that shop is patently not an ironmongers now, but the lovely signage has been retained...
Posted: 08.11.2012  
 
Joe Cashin Photography(Thanks for 11 Million views
Time has almost stood still here.
Posted: 09.12.2012  
 
Gonzo-Geezer
30th April 2014 My maternal grandfather Tomás Greed (circa 1885-1927) would have known this view of Rathdowney, Co. Laois, as he was from just to the east of the village of Clonmore, Tipperary, close to the Co. Laois border nearby (formerly Queen's County). He raised a family of nine children, with his wife Mary Greed (nee Bergin), including my late mother. He is buried in Killavinoge cemetery, situated between Rathdowney and Clonmore, with his wife and some of his children, including my late mother. I have pictures of Killavinoge cemetery which I will post sometime.
Posted: 30.04.2014