[Crowds on Westland Row in Dublin waiting to meet prisoners released under general amnesty, taken from the railway bridge at Westland Row station]

[graphic]
Main Creator: Keogh Brothers Ltd., photographers
In collection: Keogh Photographic Collection
Format: Photo
Published / Created: Monday morning, 18 June 1917.
Subjects:
Notes:Additional information about this photograph is available on the National Library of Ireland's Flickr Commons photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8505718647

Physical description: 1 photographic negative glass 12 x 16.5 cm.

Citations/References: Into the Light: An Illustrated Guide to the Photographic Collection in the National Library of Ireland / Sara Rouse. - Dublin : National Library of Ireland, 1998 p. 49.

more
Crowds waiting to meet prisoners released under general amnesty.
This photo must have been taken from the railway bridge at Westland Row station as was (Pearse Station now).
Date: Monday morning, 18 June 1917 (thanks DannyM8)
NLI Ref.: Ke 125

Comments

mogey
goo.gl/maps/QtrUP changed a bit except for the corner building
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
mogey
great atmospheric photo
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@mogey And Nichol's Undertakers are still there! I was wondering about the "nurse and patient" too, but perhaps a chambermaid peering over a guest's shoulder?
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
PaganTree
Fantastic Photo!
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
 
DannyM8
Here is the date, 18th June 1917 Then, on June 15th 1917, a general amnesty was granted to the remaining Irish prisoners. Put on a train from London, and a boat from Holyhead, they arrived at Dublin's Westland Road station on the 18th.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
Streetview
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
The distinctive corner entrance to the building on the corner of Pearse Street and Lombard Street still stands although the arched window to Pearse St. has been modified maps.google.com/maps?q=Westland+Row,+Dublin,+Ireland&...
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
The 1907 OS Map shows a hotel just to the north of the railway bridge
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 Fantastic, Danny! Monday, 18 June 1917 it is. Do you think that's "our tram" in the background during the first part of that film?
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
McNestry Patrick, Worked in Dublin as a Silversmith and was a well know Association Football player. He received the death sentence which was commuted to a ten year prison sentence for his part in the Rising. On Sunday the 17th of June 1917 along with all other male prisoners from the Rising still in custody he was taken from Pentonville Prison London, he was put on a special train to Euston Station and then to Holyhead where they were put on board the Mail Steamer Munster and then to Kingstown where a train took them to Westland Row Station Dublin, they arrived on the morning of Monday the 18th and were greeted by a large cheering crowd.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 "... mopified"? :)
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
The Grosvenor Hotel "5 Westland Row, 1879-1974; succeeding the Royal Hotel, 5 Westland Row, 1835-1878, which started its existence as the Royal Railroad Hotel" www.kintree.net/info/history3.pdf
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@nlireland I've modifed that, thanks! :-)
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 What accuracy. Have now added "morning" to our date!
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 Great that mopifications are so quick in an online environment...
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 Excellent, from the the looks of your 1907 map, it would have been no. 5. And it's right next door to Lalor at no. 4 - definitely the Grosvenor Hotel!
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq
Trying to spot the movie cameraman ... ??
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@beachcomberaustralia Me too! He's somewhere in line with the lamp post.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
A sign for Nichol's Undertakers can be seen on Lombard Street just beyond the bank. The business is still there to this day! www.nichols.ie/ established in 18 EDIT: Sorry - just realised that Carol spotted that 2 hours ago!
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
Swordscookie
While the crowd appears to be very dense there are a number of horse drawn conveyances in amongst them. Behind the men standing on the roof of the bus or carriage there is a cart or float and behind that there are a number of ladies in a pony trap. You would have to wonder what the British soldiers thought of the whole affair?
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
John Spooner
I've counted 12 bare heads, but I'm sure I've missed some.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@johnspooner 12?! That just shows what a momentous event this was, to allow social convention to slide to that extent...
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
guliolopez
@nlireland @beachcomberaustralia RE: "Trying to spot the movie cameraman ... ??" "Me too! He's somewhere in line with the lamp post." I may be going completely guzz-eyed, but is that a camera and tripod actually in the door of the bank? (Would fit with the lamppost orientation and vertical height. But maybe I'm just imagining it).
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
John Spooner
@nlireland Certainly a higher proportion of hatlessness than this
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@20727502@N00 You are NOT going completely guzz-eyed (a common complaint among Flickroonies). You could be right... Sorry, guliolopez, left out NOT in comment! Can't be going around calling our regulars guzz-eyed, even if they suggest it themselves.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@johnspooner And a higher proportion of hatlessness than this! Competitive hatlessness commences... :)
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@20727502@N00 You could be right
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
It looks like Mrs Inglis was the confectioner and she had two apprentices in 1901 www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai003733885/ I can't make out what Mr Inglis' profession was - can anyone else decipher it? They had moved to Drumcondra by 1911 www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Dublin/Drumcond... but were still in the business and Mr Inglis is now listed as a Confectioner
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
John Spooner
@nlireland Not much hatlessness here .
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
John Spooner
@77199267@N03 "Bookseller's Assistant" ? The word following "Bookseller's" appears to begin with the same letter as "Agent" below, the following squiggles are like "ss" in "Commission" below, there's a dot suggesting an "i", and whoever wrote the entry ran out of space at the end of the box, and abbreviated the -tant to -tt.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@johnspooner Could be - seems a lowly title for a 51 year old man though.
Posted: 25.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
By 1911's census, the Inglis's have moved to Drumcondra, and William is listed as a Confectioner, like Agnes.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
But the 1913 phone book at Lennon Wylie shows Inglis, W, Confectioner at 3 Westland Row. So it looks like the business remained in town, and the Inglis's moved out to a leafy suburb.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
That 1913 telephone directory also lists Grindley, G. H., Chemist, at #2.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Mr. G.H. Grindley is listed in this yearbook from 1885 at t Westland Row, and here he is (George Howel) in 1901, living in Rathmines.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Here is Matthew B. Lalor, tobacconist, in 1901, living in Blackrock., aged 48, and here is Matthew R. Lalor, Wholesale Tobacconist, in 1911, 58, also in Blackrock. I think that B. in 1901 is a transcription error.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
blackpoolbeach
The Chippenham Auction Rooms. A "You May Telephone From Here" double sided enamel sign, the design in the form of a bell, by Wildman & Meguyer, in excellent condition, 19"x19". Sold for £260 www.catalogue-host.co.uk/chippenham/2012-02-25/lot_139
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
To save you all from looking it up, the Inglis's number (from which you may telephone) is Dublin 929.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
There is what looks like a Royal Arms type sign at Grindley's - maybe a Royal Society of Chemists or something?
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley Not the Royal Pharmaceutical Society anyway
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Having a root around for Nicholseses in the census I came across this gentleman: William K. Magee, Assistant Librarian (Civil Service) (Nat. Lib. of Ireland). Say Hi to him for us, Carol!
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley/ And the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries has two unicorns
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
And the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (which has a school of pharmacy) has two mooses.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@gnmcauley Well now, a rebellious librarian who refused to give any information about his religion - intriguing! Plus don't mean to be pedantic, but isn't the plural of moose = meese, rather than mooses?
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
Swordscookie
@gnmcauley @nlireland Mr. Magee has to be one of the other side I bet? @nlireland I reckon the plural of moose is mise!
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@swordscookie @gnmcauley By 1911, William Kirkpatrick Magee was boarding in Hume Street alongside Church of Ireland / Quakers / Roman Catholics - still refusing information. I think this is really unusual, and quite fascinating. Have any of you seen "Information Refused" before? I don't think I have. This form was presumably filled in by Laura Dunning (head of household). She's put William as Gentleman first, then scratched through it and put Asst. Librarian...
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@nlireland 581 refused in 1901 and 1170 in 1911
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
2 with National Library connections in 1911 Richard Irvine Best and Francis Cruise O'Brien
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 Richard Irvine Best became our chief librarian (later called Director) in 1924 until he retired in 1940.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@nlireland I Bet RIB would have known everything about the DBC set-up at Library Towers. Any reply to your e-mail about the DBC?
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@79549245@N06 Going completely off point now but Francis Cruise O'Brien's census entry is an interesting one. He must have one of the longest entries under Rank, Profession or Occupation:
M.A Univ. Coll. Dub. National University Author & Writer, Political & Literary Essays & Dramatic Criticism
Is the Kathleen Cruise O'Brien, "Author of fiction", listed here, Francis' sister or his wife, Kathleen Sheehy? Curious...
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@77199267@N03 you ask a very interesting question. Surely even though they are both listed as single it would be a coincidence if he had a sister with the same name as his wife?. I cannot find any record of their marriage date.
Posted: 26.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@79549245@N06/ There are no Cruise O'Briens in the 1901 census and I can't find a brother and sister, Francis & Kathleen O'Brien of the right age to fit with this scenario. So was it a clerical error, or a statement of defiance? Perhaps they had married in a registry office and it wasn't recognised in official records?
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 @79549245@N06 According to DIB, he had a sister Cathleen and "... orphaned by the deaths of both parents, during his college years he lived with his sister on Leeson St."
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
And would you look at this, written by Kathleen Cruise O'Brien! Written by sister or wife of Francis?
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Here is a Francis O'Brien in 1901 of the right age, with a younger sister Catherine. [edit: No good, Cathleen should be just 2 years younger]
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley Except the sister's age is out by four years. @nlireland/ "living with his sister" suggests that the sister was older, no? or at least established in her own home. (I don't want to spoil the intrigue by settling for the sister explanation!)
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 Nope, far be it from me to spoil your intrigue, but here they are, aged 25 and 23...
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Here is Francis Sheehy Skeffington, also on the list of Information Refuseds.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 No reply yet, Danny. Think the expert in question is away at the mo.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@nlireland @gnmcauley@77199267@N03 Here is one of my favourite census entries from 1911 - I wonder what was written before the Enumerator called the Occupation ?? Introducing Maud Hamilton
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley That's odd. His wife's name was Hanna not Emily en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanna_Sheehy-Skeffington
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@79549245@N06 well Elliot Place was the heart of the Monto maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,716316,735020,7,9 It's a bit ironic that the next street over was called Faithful Place, although there is a Beaver street further along (I'll stop now before I get into trouble)
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
You learn something new every day - never knew this about Skeffington! During the week of the Easter Rising, Sheehy-Skeffington, who had been living at 11 (now 21), Grosvenor Place, Rathmines, Dublin, was concerned about the collapse of law and order. On the evening of Tuesday, 25 April, he went into the city centre to attempt to organise a citizens militia (police) to prevent the looting of damaged shops. He was arrested for no stated, or indeed obvious, reason while returning home, by members of the 11th East Surrey Regiment at Portobello Bridge along with some hecklers who were following him, and, after admitting to having sympathy for the insurgents' cause (but not their tactics), he was held as an enemy sympathizer. Later that evening an officer of the 3rd battalion Royal Irish Rifles, Captain J. C. Bowen-Colthurst (a member of a County Cork family of the landed gentry), sent Sheehy-Skeffington out with an army raiding party in Rathmines, held as a hostage with his hands tied behind his back. The raiding party had orders that he was to be shot if it was attacked.[5] The former Kelly's tobacconist at Kelly's Corner, where Sheehy-Skeffington was taken Bowen-Colthurst sought out "Fenians". He went to the home and shop of Alderman James Kelly at the corner of Camden Street and Harcourt Road, from which the name "Kelly's Corner" derives. Mistaking the Alderman (who was a Conservative) for a rebel, the soldiers destroyed the shop with hand grenades. Bowen-Colthurst took captive a young boy, two pro-British journalists who were in the shop — Thomas Dickson and Patrick MacIntyre — and a Sinn Féin politician, Richard O'Carroll, all of whom he had shot. Skeffington witnessed the two murders on the way to Rathmines. The two journalists were killed with him the following morning. Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington was not told about her husband's detention or his death and only discovered what had happened four days later, when she met the chaplain of the barracks. Bowen-Colthurst attempted a cover-up and ordered the search and ransack of Skeffington's home, looking for evidence to damage him. This event resulted in a Westminster-ordered cover-up, as a result of which Bowen-Colthurst was detained in an asylum for eighteen months. He would later retire to Canada on a full pension.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@77199267@N03 Agree with what you say - but what is written above the enumerators note?
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 We've screwed in our monocles here, and it looks vaguely like a very scrawled Information ??
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@77199267@N03 If you could stop there, that'd be great. Don't want to have to put you on the Naughty Step for a time out...
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@nlireland @77199267@N03 Naughty Step aside, at first look, I thought it was a word which starts with an N as in Nymph and an O and ending in iac - but I dont Think So. Interestingly there were 157 persons (women) with the same profession noted, all of them save for our Maud were identified only by their initials, given the fact that they were all incarcerated in some Gaol or other!!!!
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
Very Curious - that both would end up using different names - Johanna Sheehy was born on 24 May 1877 in Kanturk, County Cork, the first child of Elizabeth (nee McCoy) and David Sheehy. Johanna always disliked her first name and in later life she became known as Hanna Francis Sheehy Skeffington was christened Joseph Christopher and was known as Joe by most of his family. He was called Frank when he went to university
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Emily is not a transcription error, either (as in a lot of these census records). It is clearly Emily in the original. She was also spoofing about her age: she was 33 in 1911, not 28, and a year older than her husband. Here she is as Hanna, 23, in 1901. And here is Joseph C.K. Skeffington, 22, Professor of Languages in 1901.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@gnmcauley Carol we need your Irish Times Subscription..... Saturday Nov 5th Life through a century-old lens HISTORY: TERENCE KILLEENreviews Dublin 1911Edited by Catriona Crowe Prism, 245pp. €20 ON CENSUS NIGHT in 1911, which fell on Sunday, April 2nd, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, wife of Francis Sheehy Skeffington, appears not to have been at home to have her name included in the census. Her absence was not coincidental. She had removed herself to a remote cottage in Co Wicklow in protest at the denial of the vote to women, part of a suffragette boycott of the census organised both in Ireland and in Britain. The name of an Emily Sheehy Skeffington is inserted on the census form, apparently later, squeezed between those of her husband and son. Both Francis and Hanna refuse to state their religion, probably as a protest against having to answer this question.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@gnmcauley Hanna Sheehy Skeffington was absent from her home at 11 Grosvenor Place with the purpose of evading the census. In later years, she claimed to have spent the night in Wicklow in a cottage given to her and some other boycotters by Countess Markievicz. She recalled with amusement that "we led the police dance, camping on the hills or in empty houses, scattered far and wide." The police reports from the period give no indication that they wasted any energy in attempting to track these women to their hillside refuges. Again, however, the local enumerator did try to ensure that the census was not distorted by Hanna Sheehy Skeffington's absence. Unfortunately and amusingly, James Crozier made a bit of a mess of it. Here you can see the return made by Hanna's husband, Francis, and Crozier's effort to amend it in which Hanna Sheehy Skeffington is forced in between the lines, but she is mistakenly named Emily Sheehy Skeffington. As in the case of James Cousins, Francis Sheehy Skeffington enumerated the female servants.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
In the memoir of James and Margaret Cousins written in 1950, James recalled that on census night, Margaret and Lizzie Duffy, their domestic servant, left to stay at a nearby house that had been vacant for sometime and therefore "not on the enumeration list." James remembered that he was suffering from scarlatina fever at the time so he was left at home in bed with the form, a pen, an envelope and some disinfectant. Census 1911 see note at end of this form
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@79549245@N06 I think it might be "No Information" written on Maud Hamilton's census entry which was probably what the enumerator filled in in her presence with the parentheses added afterwards
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@77199267@N03 Let's go with no information.
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
Niall McAuley
Here is the longest occupation I've seen so far: George Prescott, who appears to have been a Mad Scientist: Electrical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Architect Maker of Surgical Apparatus Maker of Theatre Light and "Effect" Apparatus, Maker of Philososphical Instruments. Secretary of the Instrumental Musical Society Secretary of the Dublin Food Packing Co. Limerick
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley Hanna's sister Catherine's age in the 1901 census tallies with that of Kathleen Sheehy Skeffington in the 1911 census entry. Another sister Mary is married to Tom Kettle by this time www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Dublin/Pembroke... Kettle, Cruise O'Brien and Skeffington were three friends and schoolmates who married the three Sheehy sisters. The fourth sister, Margaret, married a solicitor, John Francis Culhane and moved to Canada in 1922. Here's a photo of the four sisters...
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
ccferrie
@gnmcauley George Prescott was certainly a renaissance man - this from the National Maritime Museum
...a most interesting character named George Prescott. He was a man of many and varied talents who died in December, 1942, after having lived for almost a century. He was an optical and scientific instrument maker, and an electrical engineer, when such disciplines were in their infancy and he was responsible for building some of the clocks that regulated the time-ball that was positioned on the Ballast Office on Aston’s Quay in Dublin. These were linked electronically to a clock in Dunsink Obsevatory and the ball was dropped every day at a precise hour to allow seafarers in the Port to adjust their clocks. He was also an optician, and an advertisement in a contemporary Thom’s Directory gives a list of his more notable customers that included royalty, politicians, and well-known public figures. Prescott lived at Sandefjiord on the Pigeonhouse Road in Ringsend, a house that he built himself in 1896. He incorporated parts of the wreck of the Finnish sailing ship PALME into the building, notably using the main companionway from the cabin as the stairs. He also used panelling from the cabin and timber decking as the floors. Prescott later built another house, ‘The Hermitage’, at 20 Strand Road, Merrion, in which he lived for the rest of his life. George was a painter and a talented musician who played the cello and amongst his many other accomplishments, he played the organ in St. Michan’s Church in Dublin. During the 1920s, George produced Gilbert and Sullivan Operas with the students of the Royal Irish Academy of Music in which he not only performed and sang, but also painted the stage scenery...George Prescott and many of his friends were also members of the Dublin Sketching Club.
And here's the man himself:
Posted: 27.02.2013  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@79549245@N06 Sometimes I think you people only want me for our NLI Irish Times subscription! :) What would you like me to check, Danny? You have that review. Do you mean from March 1911 to see if Hanna's taking to the hills was reported on?
Posted: 28.02.2013  
 
DannyM8
@nlireland No need to check anything, I think it is clear now that Hanna went off to the Country and that the enumerator in his wisdom added her in as Emily after making an extensive investigation into everything but her forename. What a Facinating family!!
Posted: 28.02.2013