Photograph taken ca. 1888-1890
Note: Since first posting this image in 2010, the events it captures were covered in an episode of a TG4 documentary series. The episode of "Tríd an Lionsa" is available on TG4's catuch-up plater.
Format: glass negative
Part of: National Library of Ireland Eblana Collection.
For more photographs in this collection see National Library of Ireland catalogue: catalogue.nli.ie
Reference number: EB2664

Comments

merriman2010
Excerpt from Frank O'Halloran Account at www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/history/bodyke_eviction... The police were not more than 25 feet away, but they did not fire. The bailiffs attacked the corner, and the sisters threw cans of boiling water on top of them, making them speedily retire, while the girls stood waiting with more water ready to fire, but they took no notice of them either. The crowd outside became terribly excited, as they saw by this that we meant no surrender in earnest. I had a long pole defending the corner, and I found that I could not use it effectively from the porthole which I was at, as I was a left-handed man; so I got an iron bar and broke a hole through the roof, a shower of slates falling on the emergency men outside. Then I got water and took off the slates, which I fired at them, but I don't think any took affect but, anyway, we had the satisfaction of seeing that we made it impossible for them to continue at the corner. For about three-quarters of an hour the struggle continued, and finally, the defeated emergency men gave up, some of them well scalded. Then they went to the end of the house and the police got scaling ladders to get through the window on the second storey, so I exchanged places with my brother and went to the porthole at the gable-end, which he had been defending up to this. At this time some unfortunate delay occurred about handing up the water. My brother went to see what was wrong, and while he was so engaged a policeman entered through the window. He was met by Honoria who caught a grasp of his sword-bayonet. He was just bent down in the act of jerking it from her when I saw him. I knew that if he gave the pull he would have cut her fingers off and ruin her hands. There was not a moment to spare. I jumped off the platform and struck him with my clenched fist under the chin and sent him sprawling to the other end of the room. My sister was then in full possession of a rifle, bayonet and all, and sure she did use it. She rushed to the window and scattered the police outside right and left, and cleared the ladder outside, which was crowded. All this happened in a few seconds. My brother had now returned with the water, and I went to Honoria's assistance. I got a big pole: there was a policeman at the top of the ladder; I put it to his chest, pushed him into an upright position. The policeman behind him pressed him on, while the crowd yelled, wild with delight. I shoved harder and he fell to the ground, amidst deafening cheers and shouts. Others pressed on, to meet the same fate. Now we thought it was high time to evict the policeman we had inside. We got him near the window to throw him out. The police outside rammed their bayonets and wounded us several times, so we had to throw him back again instead of throwing him out. The fight now began properly. We attacked them with all our might and so fierce was the struggle that we smashed a sword-bayonet and injured several of those outside. Eventually we cleared the window again and victory was hailed with thunders of applause outside. The forces outside were dismayed, as if they did not know what to do next.
Posted: 16.12.2010  
 
cuisle west ... away awhile
What an amazingly well documented, wonderful recounting of the trials and tribulations of the evictions ... leave it to the Irish to have a great, high-time with the details of the figtht. The photo is brilliant too, with the three of them looking all alike, and the third one from the left seeming from another family entirely.
Posted: 15.09.2011  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@32465819@N05 In the lacey blouse? She's my favourite!
Posted: 15.09.2011  
 
photoshades59
This is an outstanding picture...what an attitude on the girl 3rd from the left...her face is so full of life...not a woman to be trifled with I think. The twins have a lot of the same emotions showing, but in a much more restrained manner, and all have the barely hidden smirk of the conspirator...I love this picture.
Posted: 20.10.2011  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@67975225@N07 One of my favourites too!
Posted: 20.10.2011  
 
cheryldecarteret
Yes I also love this picture!! I have passed Bodyke, but never been there. Next time I'm in County Clare, I shall make sure of a visit, and remember the O'Halloran girls!!
Posted: 23.11.2011  
 
Infonomx.com (www.infonomx.com)
Me again. Not as good as wanted but ... @24595374@N05/6656086711/in/photostream
Posted: 08.01.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
@24595374@N05 Still nice though, thank you!
Posted: 08.01.2012  
 
K. Levins
Great photo, totally love the 3rd girls attitude and hard to believe it was 120 years ago. Go the O'Halloran girls! !!!
Posted: 12.01.2012  
 
Marine Attack Squadron ( VMA ) 225
I don't care who you are; Don't mess with these Girls. They will eat you for lunch !!!
Posted: 12.01.2012  
 
joekennedy52
Would love to know what ever happened to these girls, boy were they tough women.
Posted: 13.04.2012  
 
Ken's Aviation
I little history lesson for someone in Texas (me). My wife has some Irish blood in her, though. She'll like this story! :o)
Posted: 08.07.2012  
 
Ken's Aviation
I nice piece of history for someone in Texas (me). My wife will like this story, she has some Irish blood in her. :o)
Posted: 08.07.2012  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
For anyone interested, though we first posted this image back in 2010, the events it captures were covered in a 2015 episode of Tríd an Lionsa (available, as of Nov 2015, on the TG4 web-player).
Posted: 29.11.2015  
 
moccasinlanding
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] I watched this episode and appreciate the link. My spouse, a "first generation" with both parents coming as young people to Boston MA from Co. Clare back in 1913 and 1914, has very strong feelings about the troubles.
Posted: 22.12.2015  
 
RCandeias
I did a colour version of this photo. It's that 3rd girl's fault, she ensnared me with those eyes. They all have an unusual tan, not something one would immediately associate with the Irish people. Cheers www.facebook.com/TheTruthInColor/photos/a.853308841373560...
Posted: 09.06.2017  
 
National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Very nice [https://www.flickr.com/photos/rccolor] - Thanks!
Posted: 09.06.2017  
 
tsuerqnx40
I did a colourised and enhanced version. flic.kr/p/2mckf3u
Posted: 20.07.2021